Your Boxing Stance

Step 1

Position yourself sideways toward the target, so that you lead with the shoulder opposite that of your strong punching hand. If you’re a right-handed boxer, point your left shoulder toward the target. If you’re left-handed point your right shoulder toward the target.

Step 2

Keep your feet apart at shoulder-width, and, if you’re right-handed, take a step forward with your left foot,if you are left handed step with the right foot.

Step 3

Line up the heel of your lead foot with the toes of your other foot.

Step 4

Turn both feet at a 45-degree angle to your target.

Step 5

Bend your knees and hips slightly, keeping your back fairly straight.

Step 6

Lift your back heel off the floor, no more than 3 inches. Your body should be balanced in this stance, and you shouldn’t stagger if pushed in any direction.

Step 7

Bring your elbows close to your sides and raise your forearms.

Step 8

Protect the main portion of your torso by keeping your forearms in front of you. Hold your arms firmly upright, but relaxed.

Step 9

Lean your head slightly forward.

Step 10

Keep your hands at chin or cheek level.

Step 11

Turn your palms inward.

Boxing Punches

Jab(1) – While it is the least powerful, it is the most important punch. I didn’t make this one up. The great Muhammad Ali used jabs more than 90% of the time. If jabs are the low-power boxing punches, how can it become the most important?

The Jab has several purposes: it wears down the opponent gradually, it gives him a little sting, it keeps him away from you, and it can be used to set up stronger punches. In other words, jabs can be used both as an offence and as a defence.

The Jab or 1- The 1 should be thrown at speed with the movement initiating at the hips.

1.Snap a relaxed left arm (right if southpaw) away from the body

2.The forearm rotates through the last third of the punch landing on the target with the palm rotating down

3.The arm returns back to its original position as fast as possible along the same path it went out.

4.This is a smooth movement that should not upset the balance and position of the stance.

Straight/Cross(2)-A straight punch is the quickest and most direct way to hit an opponent. Since it can be executed in the traditional stance, a boxer can use a straight punch at his disposal – more often than any other type of heavy punches in his arsenal. A straight punch is also the strongest and the most preferred knockout punch by many boxers.

It usually targets the head of the opponent and provides a fairly good amount of damage when set up by a jab or used in combos. A (right/left) straight punch is also known as a (right/left) cross punch since it is thrown from the chin that produces a crossing motion across the body. When it follows a jab, this move is called the “one-two” combination.

The Straight Right(Left) or 2- The 2 should initiate from the back foot and hip with a full rotation in the hips.

1.The body weight should rotate on its axis with the arm straightening out and the fist impacting fully on its target.

2.At the moment of impact the forearm should rotate and palm should spin towards the floor at speed.

3.It is essential not to “lean” into the punch but to rotate fully as pushing the bodyweight over the front foot can upset balance.

4.The hand should come back along the same path that it went out on.

Hook (3,4)- A hook can only be done effectively by swinging the arm in a horizontal arc. It is best when set up by a jab and followed by an uppercut or another hook. It possesses knockout power.

The left hook (Right for southpaw) or 3- As the name suggests the hook is thrown with a bent arm from the lead hand. It is usually thrown in a combination of punches and is thrown at speed.

1.The weight should shift to the rear leg with the front foot pivoting as quickly as possible to the left.

2.The left arm is bent, relaxed and whipped through the target with the forearm level to the ground.

3.At the moment of impact the knuckles are pointing outwards with the thumb up.

4.The right hand should be held high in a guarding position.

The right hook (left hook for southpaw) or 4- As with the left hook the arm is bent. Be sure to rotate the right hip (left hip for southpaw) as you would on straight cross.

1.The weight should stay central while fully rotating the hips in the direction of the target

2.The right arm is bent, relaxed and whipped through the target with the forearm level to the ground.

3.At the moment of impact the knuckles are pointing outwards with the thumb up.

4.The left hand should be held high in a guard position.

Uppercut (5,6)- An uppercut is considered to be the most dangerous punch in boxing since it is the least used punch and thus the least practiced punch to avoid. It is a vertical punch that rises when thrown and usually targets the chin and torso. Uppercuts can be set up with a jab or thrown in combination.

It is the most effective punch to use during “inside fighting” or when boxers are close to one another.

When executed properly, an uppercut can severely inflict great damage to your opponent. The manner in which an uppercut is thrown is like curling your arm to pick up a bucket of water.

The left uppercut (right uppercut for southpaw) or

5- This uppercut should be delivered in combination with other punches.

1.The weight should shift to the rear leg with the front foot pivoting slightly

2.the arm should be bent, moving from the hips all the way to eye level.

3.The right arm should be snug but relaxed to the body.

4.The knuckles should face outwards upon impact and the hand should be brought quickly back to its starting position.

The right uppercut (left uppercut for southpaw) or

6- The right uppercut should be delivered in combination with other punches.

1.As with all right sided punches the body should fully rotate initiating the movement at the ball of the foot and rotating on your axis.

2.The arm should be bent, moving from the hips up to eye level in a fast motion.

3.The left arm should be snug, relaxed and held close to the body

4.The knuckles should face outwards upon impact and the hand should be brought quickly back to its starting position.

Punching in combinations is your best bet to score blows on your opponent. Multiple punches will spell headaches for your opponent, it increases the level of alertness needed in order to block or avoid the punches coming their way. Do not get into the same habit of throwing the same combination over and over, your opponent most likely will pick up on this rhythm and will be able to counterpunch you. You have to mix your combinations up, incorporate them with good movement, jabbing and feints. When throwing combinations, the important thing to remember is to remain balanced at all times which will help you shift your bodyweight correctly in order to hit with solid shots.

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